Contents

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION

Methodology and Transcription
Organisation

1. THEORIES OF HUMOUR
1.1 Superiority Theories
1.2 Relief Theories
1.3 Incongruity Theories

2. PERFORMANCE SPACE

2.1 Performance
2.2 Possible Origins Of Theatre
2.3 Theatrical Space
2.4 Performer And Audience Interaction

3. THE COMIC FIGURE

3.1 Some Basic Notions
3.2 The Comic Figure In History

4. CLASSIFICATION, STYLE, CONTENT

4.1 Problems Of Classification
4.2 From Style To Content

5. COMPETENCE, PERMISSION, AMBIVALENCE

5.1 Some Models of Competence
5.2 Permission
5.3 Ambivalence
5.3.1 Studies: Ethnic Humour
5.3.2 Performers
5.3.3 Audiences

6. ANALYSING HUMOUR: A PRAGMATIC APPROACH

6.1 Speech Acts
6.2 Talk In Interaction
6.3 Some Features Of Talk
6.3.1 Turn-taking
6.3.2 Adjacency Pairs
6.3.3 Preference

7. SOME GENDER ASPECTS

7.1 Gender Identities And Representations
7.2 Gender And Language
7.3 Gender And Humour


8. HUMOUR IN CONTEXT: THE THATCHER JOKE

8.1 The Performers, The Audiences, And Space

8.2 The Discussants
8.2.1 Different Competence In A Domain Of Discourse
8.2.2 Assessing Competence In The Details Of Talk
8.2.3 Non-engrossed Recipients
8.2.4 Heterogeneity Of The On-Stage Audience
8.2.5 Audience Interpretation Of The Story
8.2.6 Reconstituting The On-Stage Audience

8.3 The Collaborative Floor vs. The Single Floor

8.4 Negotiating The Serious Import Of Humour
8.4.1 Negotiating Prior Permission To Joke
8.4.2 The Interactive Establishment Of Meaning
8.4.3 Taking A Joke Seriously Adds To Its Import
8.4.4 Three Possible Positions A Joker Can Adopt When Challenged

8.5 Two Psychological Perspectives On Joking
8.6 Preference
8.7 Politeness

CONCLUSION

BIBLIOGRAPHY

HOMEPAGE

PRAGMATICS HUMOUR HOMEPAGE